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Escherichia coli

The technology is identifying sources of foodborne pathogen outbreaks more quickly and precisely than older technology. 

In PNAS this week: genetic variants linked to response to food ads, effects of MECP2 mutations in Rett syndrome, and more.

Researchers from the CDC and Georgia Tech tested the efficacy of using whole-genome shotgun sequencing to diagnose food-borne pathogens in outbreaks.

A colistin resistance gene has been uncovered in samples from an ill Connecticut toddler, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report says.

Researchers are scouring samples for antibiotic resistance genes using sequencing, NBC News reports.

The method, which uses LC-MS/MS instruments, is potentially faster and more accurate than traditional serotyping and could be useful in investigating outbreaks.

The new PCR-based test is designed to detect Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and serotype O157 directly from patient specimens.

A new software tool allows researchers to gather microbial strain-level information from metagenomic data.

Officials are using traceability software and DNA to figure out the source of an E. coli outbreak in the Pacific Northwest.

The molecular diagnostic test detects Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and the serotype O157 directly from a patient specimen. 

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NPR reports that many USDA researchers working at the two agencies that are relocating to the Kansas City area are declining to go.

Genetic genealogy has helped exonerate a man who has been jailed for 20 years, Agence France Presse reports.

A new report says genetically modified food might be necessary to be able to feed a planet of nearly 10 billion people, Bloomberg says.

In Nature this week: new RNA editing approach called LEAPER, draft assembly of Musa balbisiana banana genome, and more.