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Ebola

Right at the Source

At The Conversation, the University of Birmingham's Nick Loman writes about his group's efforts to bring genome sequencing and surveillance to disease outbreak sites.

In Nature this week: genetic variation in Sierra Leone Ebola virus, host adaptation in microsporidian pathogens, and more.

Xpert Ebola joins three other tests on the World Health Organization's list of in vitro diagnostics eligible for procurement in Ebola-affected countries.

Genome sequencing on almost 200 Ebola virus isolates from Sierra Leone pointed to a jump in genetic diversity in the virus from July to October of 2014.

Researchers plan to share Ebola and MERS viral sequence data more quickly.

The system uses off-the-shelf laboratory components and currently runs an Ebola assay based on isothermal amplification chemistry from Alere subsidiary TwistDx.

Between the Coasts

The Wall Street Journal profiles NewLink Genetics, a biotech company based in Iowa.

Not So Fast

A new analysis indicates that the Ebola virus behind the current West African outbreak is mutating at about the same rate as other Ebola viruses.

The self-contained, cartridge-based test runs on the firm's GeneXpert system.

The study is being conducted in Sierra Leone by the University of Oxford.

Pages

A German shepherd called Nala has had her genome sequenced.

A coronavirus serology test garners Emergency Use Authorization from the US Food and Drug Administration, but the Los Angeles Times asks: how will tests like that be used?

Certain gene variants in conjunction with a healthy lifestyle may keep brains young, according to New Scientist.

In Science this week: increased CD8 T cell density and increased IFN-gamma response may indicate metastatic prostate cancer patients who will respond to immune checkpoint blockade therapy.