Ebola

An OpenArray panel designed to simultaneously test for 17 viruses and 13 bacteria and protozoa was able to detect pathogens from human blood donor samples with an accuracy of about 95 percent.

Presenters at ASM have used next-generation sequencing to examine Ebola, Zika, and respiratory virus infection and transmission.

The tool has been applied to determine the pathogenic cause of hemorrhagic fever, and is powering a new test for respiratory disease pathogens.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: reverse genetics used to gauge phenotypes of loss-of-function mutations, and more.

The virus spread according to a gravity model between large population centers, and its movements were affected by geographical distance.

In Genome Biology this week: epigenetic differences in CML cells, predicting aggressive prostate cancer, and more.

An international team of researchers examined differential gene expression in blood samples from patients infected during the West African outbreak.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: Ebola virus improved ability to infect humans during recent outbreak, and more.

The Ebola virus may have mutated to better infect humans during the 2014 outbreak, the New York Times reports.

US Army scientists have developed a way to more precisely determine the amount of antigen needed as they develop an Ebola virus-like particle vaccine.

Pages

Two new Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology studies have largely reproduced the original findings, ScienceInsider reports.

DNA fingerprinting could catch some sample mix-ups at pathology labs, the New York Times says.

In Cell this week: DNA methylation and T cell exhaustion, longevity in C. elegans, and more.

A Maryland police department has turned to DNA phenotyping to develop a suspect sketch, WJLA reports.