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Ebola

Researchers trained a machine-learning model to predict animal reservoirs or insect vectors for dozens of "orphan" viruses with unknown natural sources.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: population structure in Helicoverpa, AMP-activated protein kinase levels in nicotine-exposed mice, and more.

The researchers found that the expression of certain genes was better at helping them predict when Ebola would develop than indications of infection like fever.

The Fraunhofer USA team will partner with a Fraunhofer Society institute in Germany in order to reduce the cost for its patented microchip that detects viruses including Ebola.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: approach to diagnose hemorrhagic fevers, recessive disease mutations in mixed-breed dogs, and more.

The researchers found multiple enzymes that indicate causes of dysregulated adaptive immunity and tissue damage in fatal Ebola virus disease.

The German company said the open-access platform, called Pharos V8, can provide real-time PCR results in 10 minutes.   

An OpenArray panel designed to simultaneously test for 17 viruses and 13 bacteria and protozoa was able to detect pathogens from human blood donor samples with an accuracy of about 95 percent.

Presenters at ASM have used next-generation sequencing to examine Ebola, Zika, and respiratory virus infection and transmission.

The tool has been applied to determine the pathogenic cause of hemorrhagic fever, and is powering a new test for respiratory disease pathogens.

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The American Prospect writes that the pilot program to test the DNA of migrants could lead to more family separations.

An international commission is to develop a report on how researchers, clinicians, and regulators should evaluate the clinical applications of human germline genome editing.

The US Department of Agriculture presents a new blueprint for animal genomic research.

In Genome Research this week: repetitive element deletion linked to altered methylation and more in form of muscular dystrophy; human contamination in draft bacterial and archaeal genomes; and more.