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E. coli

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: genetic variants linked to response to food ads, effects of MECP2 mutations in Rett syndrome, and more.

Researchers from the CDC and Georgia Tech tested the efficacy of using whole-genome shotgun sequencing to diagnose food-borne pathogens in outbreaks.

A colistin resistance gene has been uncovered in samples from an ill Connecticut toddler, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report says.

Researchers are scouring samples for antibiotic resistance genes using sequencing, NBC News reports.

The method, which uses LC-MS/MS instruments, is potentially faster and more accurate than traditional serotyping and could be useful in investigating outbreaks.

The new PCR-based test is designed to detect Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and serotype O157 directly from patient specimens.

A new software tool allows researchers to gather microbial strain-level information from metagenomic data.

Officials are using traceability software and DNA to figure out the source of an E. coli outbreak in the Pacific Northwest.

The molecular diagnostic test detects Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and the serotype O157 directly from a patient specimen. 

Scientists are using sequencing to identify resistance genes and piece together the evolution of a pathogen's genome.

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An opinion piece in the New York Times urges lawmakers to keep genetic protections in place.

Research funding in Canada is to remain mostly the same, ScienceInsider reports.

In Science this week: random DNA replication errors play role in cancer, and more.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation embarks on an open-access publishing path.