depression

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genetic overlap between five psychiatric disorders, and more.

Using post-mortem data, researchers explored similarities and differences between autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, alcoholism, and depression.

'Now the Hard Work'

Business Insider reports that researchers are making headway in linking genetic variants to mental illness risk.

Ah, That's Why

Genetic testing can help identify why people aren't responding to certain mental health medications, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.

In the African American arm of a new GWAS, a risk variant in the SEMA3A gene was associated with both alcohol dependence disorder and major depressive disorder.

Best Options

The Seattle Times writes that pharmacogenomics testing can help choose medications that may work best for people with depression.

The company launched the RxMatch Antidepressant Panel as the first step to grow beyond precision oncology and offer genomic assays for a wider range of diseases.

An Australian team searches for genetic alterations linked to depression in hopes of developing personalized treatments, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

Researchers from Hong Kong imputed transcriptomes from GWAS data and compared them to drug-induced gene expression profiles.

Medication Matchmaker

NBC News reports that pharmacogenomics can help match people with depression to drugs that may work best for them.

Pages

Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

In Science this week: CRISPR-based approach for recording cellular events, and more.

A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.