depression

'Now the Hard Work'

Business Insider reports that researchers are making headway in linking genetic variants to mental illness risk.

Ah, That's Why

Genetic testing can help identify why people aren't responding to certain mental health medications, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.

In the African American arm of a new GWAS, a risk variant in the SEMA3A gene was associated with both alcohol dependence disorder and major depressive disorder.

Best Options

The Seattle Times writes that pharmacogenomics testing can help choose medications that may work best for people with depression.

The company launched the RxMatch Antidepressant Panel as the first step to grow beyond precision oncology and offer genomic assays for a wider range of diseases.

An Australian team searches for genetic alterations linked to depression in hopes of developing personalized treatments, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

Researchers from Hong Kong imputed transcriptomes from GWAS data and compared them to drug-induced gene expression profiles.

Medication Matchmaker

NBC News reports that pharmacogenomics can help match people with depression to drugs that may work best for them.

The study will combine cognitive assessments with genetic data and survey responses to gain insights into the causes of these two mental health conditions.

Researchers in Australia hope the genetic study will help take the guesswork out of prescribing medications for depression, the Hack says.

Pages

The New York Times profiles 23andMe's Anne Wojcicki and describes how she bounced back from a bad year.

Fotis Kafatos, the founding president of the European Research Council, has died, according to the Associated Press.

In PLOS this week: genomic analysis of honeybee disease, microRNA profiles of people with lupus nephritis, and more.

The Verge's Angela Chen tried out a gene test for fitness advice, but didn't learn much new information.