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Colorectal Cancer

News and reporting on colorectal cancer.

The company believes the pandemic will accelerate the adoption of its cancer diagnostics as patients and doctors look for faster and more convenient tests.

The company recently had a second pre-submission with FDA and expects to begin a prospective trial of its test in the second half of this year.

The firm reported that revenues from screening products fell 34 percent year over year, but that it took in $34.6 million in revenues from COVID-19 testing.

Most of the disease risk carriers identified in the Healthy Nevada Project did not meet clinical guidelines for screening, according to the new analysis.

The researchers said their new study supports the clinical utility of their test, which combines genomic and drug screening analyses of organoids to guide cancer treatment.

The updated guidelines now also highlight the use of PCR and next-generation sequencing to determine microsatellite instability. 

The recently renamed company will use the project to develop a new version of its next-generation sequencing assay for cancer mutational analysis.

The company recently presented results from its Aurora assay for multi-cancer screening and plans to launch a $100 test for the US and Chinese markets.

The company expects to garner clearance for its platform in the US first for Lynch syndrome as it builds additional evidence for an immunotherapy application.

The firm touts a new hybridization probe design, which it says will enable small, focused panels that reduce sequencing costs and assay time.

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Public health experts call for a transparent COVID-19 vaccine approval process in a letter; the Food and Drug Administration commissioner assures science-based approval.

The Verge reports that new gene-naming guidelines aim in part to avoid Excel-related name change confusion.

In Nature this week: tuatara genome sequence aids in understanding amniote evolution, and more.

According to the Guardian, UK virologists say in a letter to officials that their expertise has been pushed aside in COVID-19 response plans.