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cholera

Researchers found a potential alternative toxin, as well as antibiotic resistance genes, in a newly-sequenced Vibrio cholerae strain from a British WWI soldier.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: numerous mobile genetic elements contribute to Vibrio cholerae drug resistance, troponin I mutations in sudden infant deaths, and more.

OmniVis is developing the assay for cholera detection in environmental samples while the lab that created it is working toward a paper-based HIV test.

To Track Cholera

Nature calls for genomics to become part of the World Health Organization's cholera surveillance approach.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: Yemen cholera epidemic bacteria sequenced, loci linked to osteoporosis, and more.

The cholera epidemic in Yemen is caused by astrain with an unusual antimicrobial resistance phenotype that belongs to a sublineage from South Asia.

The researchers also reported that cholera strains infecting members of the same household were highly similar, suggesting in-household transmissions.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genomics tracks cholera pandemics.

By sequencing Vibrio cholerae isolates from Africa and Latin America, investigators got a look at the lineages leading to outbreaks over several decades.

Genome sequences from isolates of Vibrio cholerae collected before and after the so-called seventh cholera pandemicprovide insights into the strain's evolution.

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Australia will not be regulating gene editing of plants, animals, and human cell lines as long as no new genetic material is incorporated, reports Nature News.

The Washington Post reports that the US Department of Agriculture told its researchers to label peer-reviewed articles as "preliminary" work.

Researchers have sequenced the genomes of both the coast redwood and the giant sequoia, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

In PNAS this week: study of epigenetic patterns in mammalian eggs, clonal expansion patterns in CD8+ T cells, and more.