allergy

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: Armillaria fungal genomes; risk variants linked to asthma, eczema, and hay fever; and more.

A genome-wide association meta-analysis involving hundreds of thousands of individuals led to 130 new and known risk variants linked to all three allergic conditions.

Based on genotypes for people with or without food allergies, investigators saw loci near immune, inflammation, and epithelial genes.

The French firm said that the funds will go toward international development and the marketing of the company's autoimmunity, allergy, and theranostic products. 

The companies will provide allergy diagnosis and testing services to clinicians, hospitals, and private laboratories in Southeast Asia.

The Early Gut

The gut microbiome appears to have a role in infants' later risk of developing allergies and asthma, a new study says.

The Food Allergy Science Initiative seeks to supply the basic scientific research needed to spur future development of diagnostics and therapeutics.

An autosomal dominant form of vibratory urticaria has been linked to a missense mutation in the ADGRE2 gene that appears to affect mast cell function and inflammation.

With the help of a newly generated gene regulatory network for T-cell differentiation, researchers identified transcription factors with ties to disease symptoms.

Researchers traced peanut allergy risk back to genetic and epigenetic factors in and around immune genes.

Pages

Researchers test gene therapy targeting a different cancer protein in a new trial, the New York Times reports.

Pennsylvania State University researchers found that salivary microRNAs could predict which kids would have longer concussion symptoms, according to NPR.

The Associated Press reports Alex Azar, the new Department of Health and Human Services secretary nominee, made millions of dollars as a pharmaceutical executive.

In PNAS this week: immune profiling of breast cancer, transposable element patterns in rice, and more.