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Saladax, Bristol-Myers Squibb Expand Relationship

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Saladax today said it has expanded its relationship with Bristol-Myers Squibb and entered into a Master Early Development Collaboration Agreement.

As a result of the expansion, the companies may collaborate on multiple feasibility studies and companion diagnostic development projects, they said, adding they have already started a companion diagnostic project in an undisclosed field.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Saladax and Bristol-Myers Squibb originally forged a collaboration in 2010 to develop companion diagnostic tests for Alzheimer's disease. That partnership was amended last year to include a commercial partner, Johnson & Johnson's Ortho Clinical Division.

"Building on our previous work together, which resulted in clinically valuable Alzheimer's disease assays, we're eager to continue marrying the scientific and clinical knowledge of Bristol-Myers Squibb and Saladax to improve the lives of patients in other clinical areas," Saladax President and CEO Kevin Harter said in a statement.

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