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McKesson to Distribute Atossa Specimen Kits for Breast Cancer Dx

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Atossa Genetics today said that McKesson Medical-Surgical will distribute and sell the firm's MASCT device and patient collection kits.

The device and kits are used in OB/GYN, primary care, and women's health clinics for non-invasive collection of breast fluid. The sample is then analyzed by an Atossa subsidiary with the firm's ForeCYTE Breast Health Test, which assesses future risk of breast cancer.

"Our agreement with McKesson Medical-Surgical is another important step forward in making the ForeCYTE test the standard of care in breast cancer risk assessment," Atossa Chairman, President, and CEO Steven Quay said in a statement. "With their extensive market presence, we look forward to providing physicians a much needed early warning system by detecting the earliest, reversible precursors of breast cancer."

Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

Seattle-based Atossa has signed several distribution deals for the MASCT device and ForeCYTE test over the past year. Most recently, it signed up Thermo Fisher Scientific's Fisher HealthCare as a distributor.

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