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Ipsogen, Sysmex Reach Distribution Deal

By a GenomeWeb Staff Reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – French molecular diagnostics firm Ipsogen today announced a distribution deal with Sysmex covering Japan.

Under the deal, Sysmex, based in Kobe, Japan, will distribute certain Ipsogen blood cancer products in Japan. Sysmex also will be responsible for the regulatory submission of Ipsogen products directed at the diagnosis and monitoring of BCR-ABL and JAK2 to Japanese health authorities. Sysmex has the exclusive rights to sell these products in Japan.

Financial and other terms were not disclosed.

"We believe the combination of Sysmex's marketing reach and expertise in hematology and the unique Ipsogen products offering represent an excellent opportunity for Japanese patients to access our standardized solutions for the personalized treatment of blood cancer," Vincent Fert, CEO of Ipsogen, said in a statement.

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