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Biosearch Technologies Licenses H1N1 Flu IP from CDC

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Biosearch Technologies said today that it has licensed H1N1 influenza signatures and the influenza A sub-typing panel signatures from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Biosearch, based in Novato, Calif., said it is the first to license the CDC influenza signatures. The license grants Biosearch rights under the CDC patents to manufacture and sell oligonucleotides bearing the H1N1 and influenza A sub-typing signatures.

Last month, Biosearch announced that had licensed a family of patents from Roche Molecular Systems covering uses of the 5' Nuclease process.

"Combined with the Roche 5’ Nuclease probe patent license, Biosearch intends to provide dual-labeled 5’ nuclease probes to the growing number of Roche licensed CLIA labs providing molecular diagnostic services," Marc Beal, director of corporate development at Biosearch, said in a statement today.

Beal added that the CDC H1N1 and influenza sub-typing panel signatures will be provided as custom analyte-specific reagents, in vitro diagnostics components, and research-quality oligo components.

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