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Aquila-Histoplex Named ACD's First European RNAscope Certified Service Provider

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Advanced Cell Dx today announced Edinburgh, Scotland-based CRO Aquila-Histoplex as the first accredited RNAscope Certified Service Provider in Europe.

Aquila-Histoplex, which specializes in histological and multiplex staining technologies, has more than two years of experience performing the RNAscope assay for the academic and commercial research sectors, the company said in a statement.

Mike Millar, CEO of Aquila-Histoplex, said in a statement that the certification would ensure that the company can provide its clients with the highest quality RNA in situ hybridization data and is "a perfect tool for completing our portfolio."

ACD's RNAscope technology is an automated multiplex chromogenic and fluorescent in situ hybridization platform capable of detecting and quantifying RNA biomarkers in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. It offers quantitative molecular detection along with morphological context in a single assay, the company said. https://www.genomeweb.com/clinical-genomics/advanced-cell-diagnostics-preps-hpv-assay-launch-seeks-entry-clinical-dx-market

ACD, based in Hayward, Calif., develops cell and tissue-based analysis tools for personalized medicine.

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