Zinfandel

Allen Roses Dies

Duke University's Allen Roses, known for his Alzheimer's disease research and more, has died.

Experts led by Duke neuroscientist Allen Roses developed the database hoping to boost researchers' ability to explore the role of short structural variants in complex diseases. 

The group demonstrated the ability of a genetic algorithm to gauge whether cognitively normal people are at risk of near-term mental decline.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Using a new in-phase assay, researchers led by Duke University's Allen Roses believe they have captured key differences in APOE and TOMM40 haplotypes between African-American, Caucasian, and West African populations.

This article has been updated from a previous version to correct the pioglitazone dose to be used in the TOMMORROW trial. It is 0.8 mg/day, not 0.6 mg/day. Originally published Sept. 3.

Industry reactions to the US Supreme Court's decision to invalidate patents on isolated gene sequences were immediate and ranged from elation to disappointment.

Takeda will study the type 2 diabetes drug Actos as an Alzheimer's prevention treatment with the help of Zinfandel Pharmaceuticals' TOMM40 test to gauge which older adults at high risk of disease onset should be enrolled in clinical trials.

Takeda has taken an exclusive, worldwide license for the use of Zinfandel's TOMM40 assay as a biomarker for the risk of Alzheimer's disease in high-risk older adults with normal cognition.

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A former Synthetic Genomics attorney alleges that the firm discriminated against her and other female employees, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

Due to privacy and lab certification questions, the planned giveaway of Orig3n testing kits at a Baltimore Ravens game was suspended.

Alnylam reports positive results from its phase 3 clinical trial of an RNAi-based drug, according to Stat News.

In Cell this week: adult mesenchymal cell populations in mouse lung, genetic diversity in HPV16 and cancer risk protection, and more.