WuXi Nextcode

As of this week, the project had sequenced 39,500 genomes and returned reports for about 3,000 rare disease families and more than 600 cancer patients.

With the cash, WuXi NextCode will build out its AI and deep learning, seek partnerships in precision medicine and diagnostics, and commercialize genomic tests.

The new funds will help WuXi NextCode advance and commercialize genomic tests for the Chinese market, and strengthen its position in informatics.

At the ACMG annual conference in Phoenix last week, several labs and companies discussed their efforts in healthy genome sequencing.

At the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics annual meeting in Phoenix, WuXi presented results from a pilot study involving 190 individuals.

WuXi NextCode will integrate Geneformics' compression technology into its workflows to provide rapid, easy access to genomic datasets.

The partners will use population genomics to discover and develop novel therapeutics and companion diagnostics for a range of chronic diseases.

The company will develop a data warehouse that integrates whole-genome sequence, medical, and wearables data from patients and controls.

The partners are combining their expertise to build a cloud-based infrastructure that will support the delivery of the China Precision Medicine Initiative.

The Simons Simplex Collection of genomic data from 2,600 simplex autism families is accessible through WuXi NextCode's cloud-based database.

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The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.

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