VolitionRx | GenomeWeb

VolitionRx

The test combines two previously CE marked assays that are based on the company's Nucleosomics platform for identifying and quantifying nucleosome structural features.

The company also plans to get started this year on preparations for bringing future tests through the US Food and Drug Administration.

The company is working with DKFZ to evaluate its NuQ test, which can identify chromosome fragments circulating in blood and analyze them for epigenetic modifications.

The tests are based on the company's Nucleosomics platform for identifying and quantifying nucleosome structural features such as histone modifications.

The blood-based assay, which uses the company's nucleosome detection technology, is the first of several that will be bundled together as a test for cancer diagnosis.

The study will evaluate the ability of VolitionRx's technology to detect prostate cancer and to distinguish different prostate conditions and healthy samples.

The IP covers the detection of histone modifications in cell-free nucleosomes from circulating cancer cells.

The firm closed its offering of 2,475,000 shares of stock at a price of $3.75 per share. It plans to use the proceeds to fund colorectal cancer clinical trials. 

The firm, which was previously listed on the over-the-counter market, anticipates $8.5 million in net proceeds from the offering.

In PLOS this week: nasal microbial communities in asthma patients; sequencing-based way to detect, track schistosomiasis; and more.

The New York Times speaks with Vanderbilt's John Anthony Capra about Neanderthal genes in modern humans.

A draft guidance from the FDA suggests the agency wants to more tightly control gene-edited animals, according to Technology Review.

Researchers were among this weekend's protesters bemoaning the new US administration, Vox reports.