UCB

The Harvard spinout is commercializing inDrop single-cell sequencing technology developed by Allon Klein.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – UCB today announced a collaboration with researchers at Harvard to study the human microbiome in the intestine.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Roche has selected the Alexandria Center for Life Science - New York City as the location for its Translational Clinical Research Center. The center will serve as the critical early development presence for Roche Pharma Research and Early Development in the US.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – UCB today announced a two-year partnership with Imperial College London to identify master genetic regulators of brain networks that underlie epileptic activity.

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Emerald BioStructures and UCB have extended a collaboration aimed at identifying multiple targets in the drug discovery process, Emerald announced on Thursday.

UCB will implement a biological registration system for protein-based lead candidates based on Genedata's Biologics software.

The firms achieved a second milestone in their drug discovery pact, which utilizes Emerald's X-ray crystallography platform.

The agreement calls for the company to apply its mass spec-based phosphoproteomics platform to the study of cell signaling pathways targeted by UCB's therapeutic antibodies and to identify potential protein biomarkers linked to the drugs.

Under the technology agreement Activiomics will use its mass spectrometry-based TIQUAS platform to gain insight into the signaling mechanisms of therapeutic antibodies in relevant cell-based systems.

Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

In Science this week: CRISPR-based approach for recording cellular events, and more.

A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.