Trovagene

Novogene will validate Trovagene's proprietary urine collection and nucleic acid preservation device, NextCollect, and develop tests for the Chinese market.

AstraZeneca will use Trovagene's Trovera EGFR urine liquid biopsy test in an open-label prospective biomarker study.

The firm announced a 14 percent drop year-over-year in fourth quarter revenues and plans to reduce personnel and other costs to support development of a precision drug it has licensed.

The distributors will promote Trovagene's clinical test services, and will also gain access to the research-use kits the firm is co-developing with Boreal Genomics.

The company believes that the reduction in staff and marketing costs for its testing services will reduce its annual pre-tax expenses by about $4 million.

The companies will co-develop kits, which Trovagene will distribute globally, to analyze ctDNA from blood or urine using next-generation sequencing platforms.

The increase was driven by higher demand for its diagnostic services related to its line of blood- and urine-based assays for the detection of cancer-associated genetic mutations.

The large-scale study is designed to advance personalized medicine for pancreatic cancer to help meet the organization's goal of doubling patient survival rates by 2020.

The in-network agreement gives the health plan's 8 million members access to Trovagene's full menu of liquid biopsy tests.

Trovagene posted Q2 revenues of $104,000 compared to $50,000 in Q2 2015, missing the Wall St. estimate of $270,000.

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