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Thermo Fisher Scientific

The test, which uses an Applied Bioystems TaqPath assay and real-time PCR technology, detects nucleic acid from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

The company plans to use the net proceeds to pay in part for its anticipated acquisition of Qiagen, as well as for general corporate purposes.

In announcing a national emergency on Friday, Trump paraded out executives from the private sector as the administration tries to increase testing capacity

The test, authorized March 13, runs on the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Dx Real-Time PCR instrument and targets three regions of the SARS-CoV-2 genome.

The panel will aid in the diagnosis of patients with respiratory symptoms in about an hour by differentiating SARS-CoV-2 from other bacterial and viral pathogens.

The companies initially plan to validate biomarkers for use with the Oncomine Dx Target Test to identify NSCLC patients for enrollment into clinical trials.

Some of the market's most influential voices, including Kári Stefánsson and Linda Avey, believe that consumer genomics is not on the way out but rather experiencing a period of transition.

The company is "highly confident" that the deal, which is expected to close in the first half of 2021, will be approved by regulatory authorities.

Thermo Fisher will pay €39 ($43.35) per share of Qiagen's stock, a premium of about 23 percent on the stock's closing price on the Frankfurt Prime Standard on March 2.

The program aims to consent up to 150,000 patients to a larger biobank program and return selective preemptive PGx results through their medical center physicians.

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