Theradiag

Theradiag's Lisa Tracker monitoring kits will be referenced in supply contracts for Merck's immunosuppressant drug.

The French firm said that the funds will go toward international development and the marketing of the company's autoimmunity, allergy, and theranostic products. 

The collaborators are developing tests for rectal cancer based on microRNA and messenger RNA signatures.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Diagnostic firm Theradiag today announced a partnership with French organizations to develop diagnostic and theranostic tools for rheumatoid arthritis.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – French molecular diagnostics firm Theradiag announced Monday that its microRNA diagnostics subsidiary Prestizia has inked two deals to develop HIV/AIDS assays in collaboration with the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS).

Theradiag has named four members of its newly formed scientific advisory board who will help the company develop a microRNA-based diagnostic for characterizing HIV tropism.

Theradiag this week announced several management changes in line with the strategic organization of the company into two divisions following last year's acquisition of microRNA technology firm Prestizia.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – French theranostics and IVD firm Theradiag will distribute Luminex's xTAG RVP and xTAG GPP assays in France, the companies said recently.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Theranostics and in vitro diagnostics firm Theradiag today announced a partnership with the Regional Cancer Institute of Montpellier in France to assess the role of microRNA in predicting response to therapies for colorectal cancer.

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An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.