Takara Bio

According to Takara, the workflow allows researchers to use 25 percent of the primers and enzymes required by conventional single-cell methods.

The preliminary revenue results come ahead of the company's planned merger with Takara Bio USA Holdings.

The deal is expected to help Takara Bio Group expand its presence in next-generation sequencing library preparation and other markets.

The deal is expected to broaden Takara's portfolio of products for next-generation sequencing library preparation and genetic analysis.

The company recently urged shareholders to approve the deal, saying the cash consideration they'd receive would represent a premium over recent stock prices.

The institute has selected the firm's RNA-seq library preparation kits for use in gene expression profiling in single-cell analysis of brain cells.

The single-cell analysis firm told shareholders that while the final offer from Takara is not set in stone, they're unlikely to be offered better terms.

Last month, the companies announced that Takara Bio USA — formerly Clontech Laboratories and now a subsidiary of Japan's Takara Bio — would acquire WaferGen.

Takara said it will pay an aggregate cash purchase price that will be based on a multiple of WaferGen's 2016 revenues, capped at $50 million.

The companies will combine their respective technologies and expertise to develop new products for low-input, targeted RNA-seq applications.

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With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.

NPR reports that government and private insurers are being slow to cover recently approved CAR-T cell therapies.

CNBC reports that there are thousands of genetic tests available for consumers to chose between.

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of ducks, whole-genome doubling among tumor samples, and more.