Spiral Genetics | GenomeWeb

Spiral Genetics

In addition to variant detection technology, Omicia also gets technologies like data compression, which will aid diagnostics development and data storage. 

Both companies have made their products available on Azure, and Curoverse is collaborating with Microsoft on benchmarking tools for analysis pipelines.

Spiral has developed graph-based query technology for compressing and querying large genomic cohorts quickly that is currently being piloted at Baylor College of Medicine

DOE's JGI and Stanford will use Spiral's variant detection solutions in sustainable energy research and disease studies.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Seattle-based Spiral Genetics has shifted the focus of its business from building solutions based on existing open source software for genomic data analysis, to developing a suite of products based on a proprietary method of detecting large structural changes in the genome.

Increasing investments from venture capital firms in commercial bioinformatics indicates that the perceived value of the market is rising and suggests a level of optimism about the revenue potential of a segment of the life sciences space that historically hasn't been seen as par

Bioinformatics software startup Spiral Genetics has raised $3 million in series A financing and signed a partnership with genome interpretation firm Omicia in a bid to reach customers in the clinical genomics analysis market.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Bioinformatics firm Spiral Genetics today announced the completion of its Series A financing that raised $3 million. It also announced a partnership with Omicia.

Increasing activity from sequencing vendors and other new players, as well as a flurry of activity around clinical data analysis software and the commercialization of a number of open source tools were the key trends in the bioinformatics community in 2012.

Cautious optimism seems to be the prevailing mood among some of the bioinformatics vendors that have signed up to develop analysis tools for Illumina’s BaseSpace applications store.

In Science this week: genetic target for urothelial bladder cancer treatment, and more.

At the Conversation, the University of Oxford's Michael Macklay writes that learning genetic risk of disease is a personal decision.

Two dozen scientific organizations have endorsed the March for Science, according to ScienceInsider.

Researchers in Japan describe a chimpanzee with a chromosomal abnormality similar to human Down syndrome, Mashable reports.