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SomaLogic will supply NEB with certain of its SomaMers technology to be incorporated into NEB's products as reversible inhibitors of thermally active DNA polymerases used in PCR.

In particular, the study indicates that the technology's limit of detection is not yet sufficient to detect key low-abundance proteins and that it suffers from reproducibility issues that, while ultimately resolvable, could present significant practical obstacles in a clinical environment.

Anticipating that NGS will become a key clinical tool in coming years, several proteomics firms and researchers are investigating it as a platform for protein biomarker detection assays that use nucleotides as capture agents, hoping to take advantage of the technology's precision and multiplexing ability.

The trials will evaluate biomarker panels for lung, colon, and prostate cancer, and may include a comparison of proteomics-based lung cancer tests from Somalogic and Celera.

The company released results from studies of its six-protein diagnostic panel for lung cancer at this month's AACR meeting and this summer may take part in a 300-patient trial sponsored by the NCI's Early Detection Research Network.

In a study involving 38 mesothelioma patients and 62 asbestos-exposed controls, the 13-protein panel distinguished between the two with a sensitivity and specificity of 92 percent, said one of the researchers.

Life Technologies, Takara Shuzo, SomaLogic, and the University of California are awarded US patents.

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The United States of America, SomaLogic, Samsung Electronics, University of North Carolina

The test is intended both for early screening purposes and the differential diagnoses of lung nodules detected during CT scans and x-rays. SomaLogic has partnered with Quest Diagnostics to commercialize the test, with a lab-developed version slated for launch next year.

Companies developing array- or biochip-based molecular diagnostics received a shot in the arm earlier this month under the Internal Revenue Service's $1 billion Qualifying Therapeutic Discovery Project program.

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Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Slate's Jane Hu compares some at-home genetic tests to astrology.

In PLOS this week: analysis of polygenic risk scores for skin cancer, chronic pain GWAS, and more.