Sigma-Aldrich

Universities and research institutes are making CRISPR/Cas9 more accessible than ever through new and existing core facilities.

Sales for the firm's life science segment jumped 25 percent year over year to €3.36 billion from €2.68 billion.

After falling for three years in a row, mergers and acquisitions in the omics space rose sharply in 2015, driven by a few billion-dollar-plus deals.

The deal creates a science sector giant able to "cover every step of the biotech production chain."

The firm expects its acquisition by Merck KGaA to be completed this month.

Based on Olink's proximity ligation technology, Duolink allows for detection of low-abundance proteins with higher specificity than conventional immunoassays.

Sigma-Aldrich will participate in the university's Catalyst Program, which is designed to support translation of early biomedical discoveries into commercial products.

Sigma-Aldrich is selling the business in order to gain approval from the EC for its $17 billion acquisition by Merck KGaA announced a year ago. 

The arrayed lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNA libraries provide the tools to knock out every known human or mouse protein-coding gene.

Sigma-Aldrich will distribute IROA's Mass Spectrometry Metabolite Library of Standards worldwide. 

Pages

The New York Times and ProPublica look into the close relationship between a startup and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Yahoo News reports millions of dollars are being transferred from NIH, CDC, and other programs to pay for the housing of detained undocumented immigrant children.

In Science this week: in vitro generation of human reproductive cells, and more.

Researchers gave a handful of octopuses MDMA to find that they too act more social on the drug, Gizmodo reports.