Siemens

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Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics last week introduced the Siemens Tissue Preparation Solution, which the company claims is the first fully automated method for isolating nucleic acids from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

DxNA of St. George, Utah, has been awarded US Patent No. 7,993,910, "Methods and apparatus for amplification of DNA using sonic energy."
William Bickmore and Danvern Ray Roberts are named as inventors on the patent.

The diagnostics firm is offering 5 million shares with a target of $35 million in total proceeds – roughly 41 percent of the $86.3 million target the company gave when it filed to go public a year ago and 52 percent of the adjusted $67 million target it set in November.

According to its recently amended preliminary prospectus for its initial public offering, the company hopes to submit a 510(k) pre-market notification to the FDA for an automated test by the fourth quarter of 2011, and to have such a test on the market in the first half of 2012.

Magna is spearheading a public-private consortium to develop a point-of-care molecular testing platform based on magnetic nanoparticles and PCR amplification. Other partners in the consortium include the Fraunhofer Institute and Siemens.

Life Technologies, Siemens, NuGen Technologies, Olympus, Riken, Hologic, and Qiagen win US patents.

US patents awarded to DuPont, Mayo Clinic, Roche, Qiagen, Olink, Siemens, Sungkyunkwan University, and Hitachi.

Siemens is asking a federal court to grant it rights to a patent covering nucleic acid amplification technology instead of Enzo.

The study supports the idea of more widespread nucleic acid-based HIV diagnostic testing, which could be a boon for Gen-Probe and Novartis Diagnostics, which offer the only approved NAT for qualitative HIV diagnosis in the US.

Siemens filed the rehearing request in response to a February ruling that Enzo's patent application covering its nucleic acid signal amplification technology predates and invalidates a patent owned by Siemens and relating to its branched DNA diagnostic systems.

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An analysis of UK Biobank data finds hemochromatosis to be more prevalent than thought, according to the BBC.

An analysis finds that female biomedical researchers receive fewer prizes than male ones, and when they do win prizes, they are less prestigious.

In Nature this week: improved genomic analysis using a graph genome reference, tumor mutational burden could predict clinical response to immune checkpoint inhibitors, and more.

Federal researchers tell the Los Angeles Times that the shutdown is causing missed research opportunities as they try to keep their experiments going.