Rules-Based Medicine

The discovery is the first milestone of a program by the partners to develop a panel of protein biomarkers they plan to use in clinical trials to develop treatments for the disease.

A plasma-based biomarker test for Alzheimer's could serve as a useful initial screen for the disease, as well as provide drugmakers with a way of selecting trial subjects that could be considerably less expensive than current methods like CSF analysis and PET scans.

Funded by the French innovation agency OSEO, the collaboration calls for the companies to develop a prototype blood-based protein biomarker test for Alzheimer's disease as well as a therapeutic for the disease and a companion diagnostic.

Citing "market conditions," the company, which last month released three new biomarker panels and plans to release a fourth in the next several weeks, pulled the initial public offering it filed for last December.

The Texas multiplex molecular diagnostics firm cited market conditions for its decision.

The test is the latest of several Alzheimer's biomarker panels developed on Rules-Based Medicine's DiscoveryMAP platform. The company plans to develop a specialized assay for research use by next year with a lab-developed test potentially following shortly thereafter.

Researchers participating in the Texas Alzheimer's Research Consortium have identified protein biomarkers in blood that differ between individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease and incorporated them into an algorithm for detecting Alzheimer's cases.

The award will enable Rules-Based Medicine to add to its OncologyMAP panel immunoassays for 150 to 180 blood-based protein biomarkers associated with cancer.

The $3 million award will go toward developing and validating multiplexed immunoassays that measure 150 to 180 blood-based biomarkers that the National Cancer Institute believes may be associated with cancer.

Biotechnology firms participating in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative have received plasma and CSF samples from ADNI participants and contributed funds for the processing of roughly 1,000 samples by biomarker discovery firm Rules-Based Medicine.

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An analysis of UK Biobank data finds hemochromatosis to be more prevalent than thought, according to the BBC.

An analysis finds that female biomedical researchers receive fewer prizes than male ones, and when they do win prizes, they are less prestigious.

In Nature this week: improved genomic analysis using a graph genome reference, tumor mutational burden could predict clinical response to immune checkpoint inhibitors, and more.

Federal researchers tell the Los Angeles Times that the shutdown is causing missed research opportunities as they try to keep their experiments going.