Quidel

Rapid immunoassay product revenues — including sales from the firm's QuickVue, Sofia, and Eye Health products — rose 40 percent year over year.

The CDC says that the number of people in the US who have been infected with diseases carried by mosquitoes, ticks, and flea bites have more than tripled in recent years.

Using an immunoassay as an initial screening tool saved approximately $36,000 over multiplex PCR panel use alone when performed in a period of high flu prevalence.

The decline matched the struggles of the broader stock market, though bright spots could be found with GenMark, Quidel, and NanoString all having good months.

The investment bank based the upgrade on potential for growth in the installed base of Quidel's immunoassay and molecular instruments, among other factors.

The increased revenues were due primarily to cardiac immunoassay sales from the newly acquired Triage and BNP businesses as well as increased sales of rapid immunoassay products.

Among the firms reporting, BGI talked about plans to cut down the time and cost of its WGS service, and Invitae's CEO made a surprising proclamation about genetic testing.

The firm plans to use $110 million of the net cash proceeds to pay down debt.

The Index underperformed the Dow, Nasdaq, and Nasdaq Biotechnology Index, reversing gains it had made in October and November.

The firm's Group A Strep test for use on its Sofia2 analyzer also received CLIA waiver from the agency.

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US Attorney General Jeff Sessions is considering using DNA tests to determine relatedness between adult and child migrants, the Daily Caller reports.

Bloomberg reports that Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics plans to offer a treatment it is developing under the "right to try" law for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

In Nature this week: expansion of disease-resistance genes among long-lived oak trees, and more.

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers report being able to determine age from dried bloodstains, Discover's D-brief blog reports.