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Quanterix

The firm reported $14.9 million in revenue, driven by an 80 percent increase in product revenues, beating Wall Street expectations.

In a study published this week, researchers presented a Simoa-based assay for tuberculosis that could ultimately be packaged as a point-of-care test.

The firm offered more than 2.7 million shares of its common stock, including 356,435 shares to its underwriters pursuant to an option to purchase additional shares.

The firm expects to use proceeds from the offering to expand its life sciences commercial operations, and improve and update its Simoa technology and instruments, among other initiatives.

The company expects the rollout of more reliable, user-friendly platforms will increase instrument usage among a substantial segment of its customer base.

Quanterix intends to grant underwriters a 30-day option to purchase up to an additional 15 percent of the shares of common stock at the public offering price.

The company posted Q2 revenues of $13.5 million, up from $8.6 million in Q2 2018 and above the consensus Wall Street estimate of $11.5 million.

Quanterix said that the acquisition will secure the supply of neurofilament light antibodies that are critical to its Simoa assays and services.

The company sold 2.2 million shares at an average price of $22.73 per share under a $50 million at-the-market equity facility it filed in March 2019.

The company posted Q1 revenues of $12.3 million, up from $7.5 million in Q1 2018 and above the consensus Wall Street estimate of $10.2 million.

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Gene editing could be an issue competitive sports need to address soon, four researchers from Arizona State University write at Slate.

A genetic alteration appears to increase heart failure risk among people of African descent, according to the Washington Post.

In his look back at the past decade, BuzzFeed News' Peter Aldhous writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing has led to "Facebook for genes."

In Nature this week: genetic "clock" that can predict the lifespans of vertebrates, new assembler called wtdbg2, and more.