On-Q-ity | GenomeWeb

On-Q-ity

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Circulating tumor cell test development firm On-Q-ity has closed its doors, according to a venture capital investor in the firm.

On-Q-ity, a company developing diagnostics that analyze circulating tumor cells to guide treatment strategies for various cancers, announced that its board of directors has appointed Michael Stocum as president and CEO.

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – On-Q-ity today announced it has raised $5 million in financing and it has appointed Michael Stocum as the company's president and CEO.

The microfluidic chip, called the On-Q-ity Circulating Cancer Capture and Characterization Chip, or C5, uses both antibody affinity and size to filter CTCs from normal blood. In a study comparing C5 and a chip using antibody affinity alone, On-Q-ity's dual capture chip "greatly improved" capture rate over the comparator.

In an interview with GenomeWeb Daily News, On-Q-ity CEO Mara Aspinall touted the advantages of the firm's platform and discussed its potential to monitor patients in clinical trials at a level not currently possible.

LabCorp will market the platform to biopharma researchers conducting clinical studies of oncology drugs.

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The startup has now raised a total of $26 million in Series A financing to support development of a biomarker-based cancer diagnostic.

On-Q-ity is developing a cancer diagnostic platform that combines monitoring DNA repair biomarkers to predict treatment response and microfluidic chips that enable the capture, enumeration, and characterization of circulating tumor cells in a patient's bloodstream.

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