Proxeon

According to Matthew Kuruc, COO of PIN member ProFact Proteomics, the network aims to help smaller firms offer complete solutions similar to those increasingly provided by large instrument vendors and to popularize non-mass spec-based proteomics workflows.

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Mårten Winge

The deal, which is expected to close within weeks, is the latest in a series of purchases of nanoflow LC firms by large mass spec vendors including Thermo Fisher Scientific and AB Sciex.

With executives from Agilent, Thermo Fisher, Waters, and Danaher presenting this week at the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference, UPLC as well as triple quadrupole and qual-quan mass spec proved primary areas of discussion.

The release of a long-awaited protein biomarker test, increased adoption of a major instrument platform, and a pair of proteome mapping milestones marked a year in which several much-anticipated advances in proteomics arrived.

The purchase, which is expected to close in the first quarter of 2011, will add a range of ion and liquid chromatography products to Thermo Fisher's portfolio, including platforms aimed at proteomics research like Dionex's UltiMate 3000 RSLCnano LC system.

The company plans to release new columns and mass spec ion source emitters sometime next year to more fully take advantage of the Easy-nLC technology, said an official.

Since launching its Accela HPLC line in 2006, Thermo Fisher has been largely quiet on the LC front, but according to a company official, today's acquisition "allows us to offer a more tightly integrated solution for proteomic LC/MS applications.”

The acquisition adds Proxeon's portfolio of nanoflow liquid chromatography systems, columns, ion sources, and bioinformatics software to Thermo Fisher's existing proteomics offerings.

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Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, Ceres Nanosciences, Nonlinear Dynamics, Proxeon, Silicon Kinetics, Kinexus

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A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

In Science this week: CRISPR-based approach for recording cellular events, and more.

A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.