Proteomics International

The proteomics firm is swapping 4 million of its shares for a 10 percent interest in CPR with the goal of moving into clinical trials and related research.

Proteomics International's PromarkerD will be tested in clinical studies alongside Dimerix's investigational chronic kidney disease drug DMX-200.

The company said it will use the funds to commercialize its proteomic PromarkerD kidney disease test and launch an analytical testing service business.

Named PromarkerD, the test is intended to predict risk of developing kidney disease in diabetics and diagnose patients with diabetic kidney disease.

The Australian company has also inked a deal to launch its proteomics-based kidney disease test in China. 

The firm seeks to raise between A$4 million and A$6 million through an offering of up to 30 million shares of its stock at A$.20 per share.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Proteomics International recently announced an agreement with inVentiv Health Clinical aimed at the development of biosimilars.

Exact Sciences' shareholders have re-elected three members of its board of directors, including company President and CEO Kevin Conroy, as well as Katherine Napier, and David Thompson.

Proteomics firm Proteomics International said this week that it has received a A$1 million (US$ 1 million) grant from Commercialisation Australia – an initiative of the Australian government – to develop its protein biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy into a companion diagnostic.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The Australian government has awarded Proteomics International A$1 million (US$ 1 million) to develop biomarkers for diabetic kidney disease into a companion diagnostic test.

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The US National Science Foundation's new sexual harassment policy is to go into effect next month, according to Nature News.

Researchers report using genotyping to tie together illegal ivory shipments and trace them back to a handful of cartels, the New York Times reports.

Researchers find that historical factors influence which genes are the most highly studied, the Atlantic reports.

In Nature this week: genomic ancestry analysis of Sardinians, current noncoding mutations in colorectal cancer, and more.