Philips

Philips has teamed with Illumina and Intermountain Healthcare's Navican on informatics for precision medicine and signed a genome analytics deal with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

The semifinalists will receive $50,000 each to develop prototypes of their concepts for submission in the second phase of the challenge.

The collaborations aim to combine Illumina's sequencing systems with Philips' IntelliSpace Genomics platform and with IBM's Watson for Genomics, respectively.

As part of the deal, scientists from Philips' Intellispace Genomics development team will relocate to NYMC's biotechnology incubator in Westchester County.

Philips plans to offer the software as a module in its IntelliSpace Genomics platform, which is used for integrating and analyzing genomic and phenotypic data.

One deal will see Philips' solution used to improve cancer patient outcomes while the other will beef up its ability to interpret data from oncology tests.

The company is currently testing two versions of the software, one for clinical and one for research use, in an early-access program.

Title: Method of and system for applying blocking material to assay substrates.
Patent Number: 8,685,486
Filed: Aug. 10, 2011

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Biocartis today announced it is developing a workflow for extracting, amplifying, and detecting tumor DNA on its diagnostic platforms in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Philips Research.

Germany's Curetis has initiated a prospective clinical trial in the European Union for its Unyvero molecular testing system and P50 Pneumonia test cartridge, the company said in February.

Pages

The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.