Philips

The partnership has allowed Philips to provide a single view of cancer patient's status, including genomic test results, through the FDA-cleared IntelliSite Pathology Solution.

 

The new European initiative promises to deliver multiple new tests and methods for improving the treatment of breast cancer and rectal cancer.

Philips and its partners aim to combine liquid biopsy with magnetic resonance imaging to enable personalized cancer treatment.

Philips has teamed with Illumina and Intermountain Healthcare's Navican on informatics for precision medicine and signed a genome analytics deal with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

The semifinalists will receive $50,000 each to develop prototypes of their concepts for submission in the second phase of the challenge.

The collaborations aim to combine Illumina's sequencing systems with Philips' IntelliSpace Genomics platform and with IBM's Watson for Genomics, respectively.

As part of the deal, scientists from Philips' Intellispace Genomics development team will relocate to NYMC's biotechnology incubator in Westchester County.

Philips plans to offer the software as a module in its IntelliSpace Genomics platform, which is used for integrating and analyzing genomic and phenotypic data.

One deal will see Philips' solution used to improve cancer patient outcomes while the other will beef up its ability to interpret data from oncology tests.

The company is currently testing two versions of the software, one for clinical and one for research use, in an early-access program.

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Researchers have treated an X-linked genetic disease affecting three babies in utero, Stat News reports.

The Associated Press reports that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is beefing up sequencing as a tool to investigate foodborne illnesses.

Researchers have sequenced samples from ancient toilets to study past eating habits and health, NPR reports.

In Nature this week: ash dieback disease fungal genome, and more.