Personal Genome Diagnostics

Using blood samples from 200 cancer patients, researchers showed that it is possible to find most early cancer cases with targeted error correction sequencing.

Advanced cancer patients at the VA will now have access to the company's blood-based PlasmaSelect 64 test as well as the CancerSelect 125 tissue test.

The belief among genomics experts that one day drugs would be given based on genomic abnormalities that cut across tumor types became reality this week.

Johns Hopkins University researchers have developed a method called targeted error correction sequencing, or TEC-Seq, to increase liquid biopsy sensitivity.

The deal replaces an existing cancer testing contract to include PGDx's CancerSelect 125 test for pan-cancer tumor profiling.

The company is developing a non-invasive test that analyzes only a small area of the genome to infer overall tumor mutational load to help guide immunotherapy use.

The company plans to develop a liquid biopsy assay that can identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment with checkpoint inhibitors.

The technology, which is patent pending, can be used to help identify cancer patients who would respond to immune checkpoint inhibition treatment.

The update includes several key initiatives such as a liquid biopsy database, a DoD-led longitudinal study, and NCI cloud collaborations with Amazon and Microsoft.

The company has been working with NGS-based ctDNA testing for some time in research, but has now made its first move into the clinical sphere.

Pages

While gene therapies may have high price tags, they could be cheaper than the cost of managing disease, according to MIT's Technology Review.

Researchers are looking for markers that indicate which cancer patients may respond to immunotherapies, the Associated Press writes.

In Nature this week: paternal age associated with de novo mutations in children, and more.

Nature News writes that researchers are still wrangling over the role of the p-value.