Pathwork Diagnostics

The Tissue of Origin Test, a microarray-based gene expression assay commercialized by the defunct firm Pathwork Diagnostics, may soon become available again.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Response Genetics today announced it has acquired the "key assets" of Pathwork Diagnostics, including its US Food and Drug Administration-cleared and Medicare-reimbursed test for diagnosing metastatic, poorly differentiated, and undifferentiated cancer.

Samsung Electronics of Seoul, South Korea, has received US Patent No. 8,469,492, "Method of printing droplet using capillary electric charge concentration." The method relies on a capillary nozzle that consists of a back end and a front end.

Pathwork Diagnostics has gone out of business as of April 2, PGx Reporter has learned.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Pathwork Diagnostics today announced a deal to offer its Pathwork Tissue of Origin Test for cancer diagnosis in China.

In a prospective study published this month, patients with cancer of unknown primary who were tested using BioTheranostics' CancerType ID assay, and who then received chemotherapy specific to their predicted tumor of origin, survived longer on average than expected for standard C

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Tufts Health Plan will begin covering Sequenom's MaterniT21 Plus trisomy 21 test and Pathwork Diagnostics' Tissue of Origin test starting Oct. 1.

A new report from the Office of the Inspector General that found wide variance in reimbursement rates for laboratory-developed genetic tests has industry players concerned that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services may reduce payment levels for some of these diagnostics.

Applied Proteomics announced this week that it has appointed Peter Klemm as CEO and James Blair to its board of directors.

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A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

Researchers generate a genetic database from skeletal remains from the 1845 Franklin Expedition to the Arctic, Live Science reports.

Researchers in China have begun another trial using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches in cancer patients, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: human DNA found in sediments from archeological sites lacking bones, and more.