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Pacific Biosciences

Researchers from Pacific Biosciences and elsewhere tested their approach on Arabidopsis thaliana before applying it to wine grape and coral fungus genomes.

The researchers believe using PacBio's Sequel systems will allow them to create high-quality reference genome assemblies.

The researchers have generated the most contiguous de novo assembly of a human genome to date and plan to use it as a reference for population sequencing projects.

The companies will combine Dovetail's genome assembly services with PacBio's SMRT sequencing and de novo assembly tools.

The DNA foundries have been funded through an £18 million ($23.5 million) investment from the BBSRC and should all be fully operational by next year.

The firm expects throughput and performance of Sequel to increase as it transitions to a high-volume SMRT chip manufacturer and with its new instrument updates.

The firm's second quarter total revenues fell compared to the year-ago quarter due to the impact of a $10 million milestone payment it received from Roche.

There is significant interest in technologies that provide long-range genomic information, but only among a subset of users.

The GenomeWeb Index fell half a percent in June, underperforming the Dow Jones Industrial Average, but far outpacing the Nasdaq and Nasdaq Biotech Index.

The University of Southern California-led team used their assembly to fill in gaps in the human reference genome and also uncovered novel spliced genes.

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Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Slate's Jane Hu compares some at-home genetic tests to astrology.

In PLOS this week: analysis of polygenic risk scores for skin cancer, chronic pain GWAS, and more.