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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

The company is working on new tools for sample preparation and data analysis that will make the MinIon more suitable for educational users.

Pacific Biosciences' launch of the Sequel instrument, Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinIon instrument, and 10X Genomics' technology excited the market in 2015.

As part of a course this fall, 20 undergraduate and graduate students used the MinIon in two hands-on "hackathon" sequencing projects.

The consortium, a group formed by a number of participants in Oxford Nanopore's MinIon early-access program (MAP), plans to conduct a series of projects. 

The researchers detected a number of known structural variants from cancer cell lines in a background of wild-type sequence, using mixtures of PCR amplicons.

Beam the MinIon Up

NASA plans to test whether DNA sequencing studies can be conducted in microgravity.

The study demonstrated the efficacy of using the Oxford Nanopore MinIon and a bespoke computational pipeline to perform metagenomics testing of viral infections in patients. 

Using MinIon sequence data, they assembled the genomes of two bacterial isolates after culturing them for two weeks in a chip submerged in a stream.

The goal is to develop a test that can identify the pathogen involved and predict antibiotic susceptibility within six hours of taking a urine sample.

At The Atlantic, Ed Yong reports on the MinION's use to track Ebola in Africa.

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Stephen Hahn, the nominee to lead the US Food and Drug Administration, underwent a Senate confirmation hearing yesterday, the Washington Post reports.

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved an RNA interference drug to treat acute hepatic porphyria.

Gizmodo looks over the past decade of consumer DNA testing to find the field to be lacking.

In Nature this week: native RNA sequencing and analysis of a human poly(A) transcriptome, nanopore sequencing-based method to analyze short tandem repeat expansions, and more.