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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

In a letter to the International Trade Commission, Oxford claimed that the suit is an attempt by Illumina to expand its monopoly in the DNA sequencing market.

The new R9 pore, which the company has licensed from VIB in Belgium and plans to release for the MinIon and the PromethIon, is based on the E. coli CsgG nanopore.

Almost Unicorn

Market research analysis firm Beauhurst says Oxford Nanopore is growing fast and highly valued.

The lawsuits relate to patents that Illumina licensed exclusively from UW and UAB on methods for using the MspA pore in nanopore sequencing.

The company is working on new tools for sample preparation and data analysis that will make the MinIon more suitable for educational users.

Pacific Biosciences' launch of the Sequel instrument, Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinIon instrument, and 10X Genomics' technology excited the market in 2015.

As part of a course this fall, 20 undergraduate and graduate students used the MinIon in two hands-on "hackathon" sequencing projects.

The consortium, a group formed by a number of participants in Oxford Nanopore's MinIon early-access program (MAP), plans to conduct a series of projects. 

The researchers detected a number of known structural variants from cancer cell lines in a background of wild-type sequence, using mixtures of PCR amplicons.

Beam the MinIon Up

NASA plans to test whether DNA sequencing studies can be conducted in microgravity.

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CBS This Morning highlights recent Medicare fraud involving offers of genetic testing.

Researchers find that many cancer drugs in development don't work quite how their developers thought they did, as Discover's D-brief blog reports.

Mariya Gabriel, a Bulgarian politician, is to be the next European Union research commissioner, according to Science.

In Science this week: a survey indicates that US adults are more likely to support the agricultural use of gene drives if they target non-native species and if they are limited, and more.