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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

Interviews with leading UK scientists revealed apprehension about losing access to European funding, limitations on freedom of movement, and an exodus of biotechs to the EU.

There is significant interest in technologies that provide long-range genomic information, but only among a subset of users.

The agency is sending an Oxford Nanopore MinIon to the International Space Station to determine if the technology's microfluidic system can work in microgravity.

At a user meeting in London this week, Chief Technology Officer Clive Brown introduced the SmidgIon and a number of other technology developments, as well as a new synthetic biology spinoff.

Two groups independently developed statistical methods that can call methylation marks from nanopore sequence data. 

Breaching the Barrier

Whole-genome sequencing advances hold promise for medicine, the Financial Times reports.

In a letter to the International Trade Commission, Oxford claimed that the suit is an attempt by Illumina to expand its monopoly in the DNA sequencing market.

The new R9 pore, which the company has licensed from VIB in Belgium and plans to release for the MinIon and the PromethIon, is based on the E. coli CsgG nanopore.

Almost Unicorn

Market research analysis firm Beauhurst says Oxford Nanopore is growing fast and highly valued.

The lawsuits relate to patents that Illumina licensed exclusively from UW and UAB on methods for using the MspA pore in nanopore sequencing.

Pages

The US Patent and Trademark Office is opening another interference proceeding in the CRISPR patent fight.

There's increasing genetic evidence that a number of ancient hominins may have contributed to the human gene pool, according to Discover's The Crux blog.

The Japan News writes that Japan needs to seize the opportunity to ensure that a wide number of people benefit from personalized cancer treatments.

In Cell this week: messenger RNA expression and translation, RNA localization atlas, and more.