Close Menu

Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

PacBio alleged in its suit that Oxford Nanopore is infringing on a patent it holds related to single-molecule nanopore sequencing.  

During a live webcast today, CTO Clive Brown provided updates on several products and processes, including the PromethIon, base calling, and 1D2 reads.

Two research groups reported on statistical methods for uncovering methylated cytosine and/or adenine bases using electrical current cues from Oxford Nanopore sequencers.

The researchers noted that the results "highlight the great potential of nanopore sequencing to analyze broad microbial community trends."

Researchers funded in part by Oxford Nanopore recently published a study showing nanopores can detect proteins at the single-molecule level.

The company plans to use the new funding to expand into Asia, with a particular focus on China.

The researchers said that although improvements are needed for accurate basecalling, the MinIon is suitable for structural variant identification and haplotype phasing. 

The assembly of the agricultural pest Rhizoctonia solani genome was more contiguous and larger than previous short-read assemblies.

During a live webcast, CTO Clive Brown provided an update on the company's development plans and upcoming updates.

Pages

In PLOS this week: preconception carrier screening program results, comparative genomics-based analysis of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, and more.

Canadian regulators are beginning to share information from new drug studies, Undark reports.

In a column at the Dallas Morning News, the Stanley Medical Research Institute's E. Fuller Torrey says the Human Genome Project hasn't delivered on promised results.

Researchers explore a possible genetic cause for some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, KOMO News reports.