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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

Dual Listings Sought

Oxford Nanopore Technologies is looking into dual listings in London and Hong Kong, according to the South China Morning Post.

The company had £13.8 million ($18.4 million) in revenues and a net loss of £56.6 million in 2017.

University of Oxford researchers used DNA scaffolds to build custom peptide nanopores that they said could make nanopore-based protein analysis more feasible.

CTO Clive Brown provided an overview of the new approach during a presentation at the firm's user meeting last week.

Under the terms of the agreement, Oxford Nanopore Technologies will not sell its 2D sequencing products in the UK and in Germany for five years.

Researchers validated 95 percent of structural variants called by PacBio sequencing versus 43 percent with Oxford Nanopore, while Illumina missed thousands.

The companies have been embroiled in several lawsuits in the US and in Europe, accusing each other of patent infringement.

The company will use the funding to build a manufacturing facility, expand commercialization efforts, and develop new products.

Most customers are still in the very early stages of testing the device but said that data yield per flow cell has been continually increasing to nearly 100 gigabases.

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