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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

The researchers plan to develop a clinical test to monitor CML patients in remission for the BCR-ABL1 rearrangement. 

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: tool to identify bacterial plasmid sequences, long-read sequencing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, and more.

More than a third of NGS users plan to purchase a new sequencing system within a year, according to the survey, conducted by GenomeWeb and investment bank William Blair. 

Shrink It Down

Portable DNA sequencers are being used in wider range of locations, the Economist reports.

Japanese researchers developing the method highlighted its ability to accurately and rapidly diagnose different strains of malaria in resource-limited endemic regions. 

The company said that several companies in China are installing the GridIon X5 sequencing platform for in-house and service work.

In its suit PacBio alleges that Oxford Nanopore infringes two patents it holds related to nanopore sequencing. 

Researchers report they sequenced and identified plant species in an "al fresco" laboratory.

The Inhale project is assessing respiratory disease tests on Oxford Nanopore's MinIon and PCR platforms from Curetis and BioMérieux's BioFire Diagnostics.

MinION in the Clinic

UK clinicians are to begin a trial using Oxford Nanopore's MinION to diagnose pneumonia, according to the Telegraph.

Pages

The Wall Street Journal looks into FamilyTreeDNA's handling of genetic genealogy searches by law enforcement.

In a point-counterpoint in the Boston Globe, researchers discuss the potential of gene editing to prevent Lyme disease, but also the pitfalls of doing so.

MIT's Technology Review reports that researchers hope to develop a CRISPR-based pain therapy.

In Science this week: atlas of malaria parasites' gene expression across their life cycles, and more.