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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

Under the terms of the agreement, Oxford Nanopore Technologies will not sell its 2D sequencing products in the UK and in Germany for five years.

Researchers validated 95 percent of structural variants called by PacBio sequencing versus 43 percent with Oxford Nanopore, while Illumina missed thousands.

The companies have been embroiled in several lawsuits in the US and in Europe, accusing each other of patent infringement.

The company will use the funding to build a manufacturing facility, expand commercialization efforts, and develop new products.

Most customers are still in the very early stages of testing the device but said that data yield per flow cell has been continually increasing to nearly 100 gigabases.

At AGBT, researchers reported on progress made in generating megabase-long reads on the MinIon, as well as initial work doing direct RNA sequencing. 

The US ITC has ruled that Oxford Nanopore's products do not infringe on single-molecule sequencing-related patents held by PacBio. 

Clive Brown, the company's chief technology officer, provided an update on the firm's business and talked about new products and planned improvements.

 

In Nature this week: nanopore sequencing and assembly human genome, method to reduce CRISPR off-target effects, and more.

Such Long Sequences

Researchers have used a portable nanopore sequencer to sequence and assemble a human reference genome.

Pages

The Wall Street Journal looks into FamilyTreeDNA's handling of genetic genealogy searches by law enforcement.

In a point-counterpoint in the Boston Globe, researchers discuss the potential of gene editing to prevent Lyme disease, but also the pitfalls of doing so.

MIT's Technology Review reports that researchers hope to develop a CRISPR-based pain therapy.

In Science this week: atlas of malaria parasites' gene expression across their life cycles, and more.