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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

  • CEO: Gordon Sanghera
  • Website: www.nanoporetech.com
  • Ticker symbol: Privately held
  • Headquarters: Oxford, UK
  • Number of employees: 250+

The UK firm's lead technology uses nanopores to measure electrical currents of molecules as they interact with the nanopores, and then identifies the molecules based on the current.

Oxford Nanopore, which has been developing a real-time label-free single-molecule DNA sequencing technology as its lead application, plans to use part of the new investment to develop its platform for protein analysis.

The firm has raised nearly $80 million since its inception. Funds will be used to accelerate development of its sequencing technology.

The researchers applied a salt gradient across the nanopore, enabling them to use about 10,000 times less starting DNA than previous versions of the method.

Paired Ends: Sep 1, 2009

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Michael Snyder, Jim McDonald

The firm's staff has grown from 25 in early 2008 to more than 60 to date, including informaticians, scientists, and engineers.

Paired Ends: Apr 28, 2009

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Hagan Bayley, Detlef Weigel, Todd Smith, Michael Sadowsky, Catalina Lopez-Correa, Garry Merry

The research, published online Sunday in Nature Nanotechnology, is the first to show that scientists can detect unlabeled single DNA bases "to a confidence level … appropriate for a highly competitive commercial sequencing system," Oxford Nanopore's CEO said.

Paired Ends: Feb 24, 2009

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Roger Pettett, Richard Resnick

In a paper appearing online in Nature Nanotechnology yesterday, researchers from Oxford Nanopore and the University of Oxford showed that they can accurately distinguish between nucleic acids using protein nanopores coupled to a detection system.

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