Close Menu

Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

New Pore and More

At a user meeting, Oxford Nanopore gave an update on what it has been working on.

Users expressed concern that Illumina would have an even tighter grip on the sequencing market but are optimistic that it would spur development of PacBio's technology.

Privately owned Oxford Nanopore offers a range of tools and and instruments based on a proprietary nanopore-based DNA and RNA sequencing technology.

The VGP released its first 15 high-quality reference genome assemblies today, which are part of the project's first phase to sequence 260 vertebrate genomes.

Predicted to Grow

The South China Morning Post reports that DNA testing kit makers are investing in China.

The Beijing-based firm said it will use the funding for research and development, to obtain additional intellectual property, and to pursue its strategic goals.

Dual Listings Sought

Oxford Nanopore Technologies is looking into dual listings in London and Hong Kong, according to the South China Morning Post.

The company had £13.8 million ($18.4 million) in revenues and a net loss of £56.6 million in 2017.

University of Oxford researchers used DNA scaffolds to build custom peptide nanopores that they said could make nanopore-based protein analysis more feasible.

Pages

CBS This Morning highlights recent Medicare fraud involving offers of genetic testing.

Researchers find that many cancer drugs in development don't work quite how their developers thought they did, as Discover's D-brief blog reports.

Mariya Gabriel, a Bulgarian politician, is to be the next European Union research commissioner, according to Science.

In Science this week: a survey indicates that US adults are more likely to support the agricultural use of gene drives if they target non-native species and if they are limited, and more.