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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

The firm has raised nearly $80 million since its inception. Funds will be used to accelerate development of its sequencing technology.

The researchers applied a salt gradient across the nanopore, enabling them to use about 10,000 times less starting DNA than previous versions of the method.

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Michael Snyder, Jim McDonald

The firm's staff has grown from 25 in early 2008 to more than 60 to date, including informaticians, scientists, and engineers.

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Hagan Bayley, Detlef Weigel, Todd Smith, Michael Sadowsky, Catalina Lopez-Correa, Garry Merry

The research, published online Sunday in Nature Nanotechnology, is the first to show that scientists can detect unlabeled single DNA bases "to a confidence level … appropriate for a highly competitive commercial sequencing system," Oxford Nanopore's CEO said.

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Roger Pettett, Richard Resnick

In a paper appearing online in Nature Nanotechnology yesterday, researchers from Oxford Nanopore and the University of Oxford showed that they can accurately distinguish between nucleic acids using protein nanopores coupled to a detection system.

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The US Patent and Trademark Office is opening another interference proceeding in the CRISPR patent fight.

There's increasing genetic evidence that a number of ancient hominins may have contributed to the human gene pool, according to Discover's The Crux blog.

The Japan News writes that Japan needs to seize the opportunity to ensure that a wide number of people benefit from personalized cancer treatments.

In Cell this week: messenger RNA expression and translation, RNA localization atlas, and more.