Close Menu

Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

When the Human Genome Project announced that the entire human genome had been sequenced the term "finished" was a matter of semantics.

A research team led by Oxford Nanopore Technologies co-founder Hagan Bayley has devised a method for unfolding proteins and passing them through nanopores.

This article, originally published Feb. 25, has been updated to clarify the content of a letter from ONT.

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have demonstrated an enzyme-driven method for unfolding proteins and moving them through a model α-hemolysin nanopore.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) - Oxford Nanopore Technologies said today that it has signed a number of agreements with academic research institutions in order to expand its intellectual property portfolio around nanopore sensing technology.

Increasing activity from sequencing vendors and other new players, as well as a flurry of activity around clinical data analysis software and the commercialization of a number of open source tools were the key trends in the bioinformatics community in 2012.

This article has been updated from a previous version to clarify some of Mariam Ayub's comments.

Life Technologies said this week that it plans to accelerate development of its Ion Torrent technology for proteomic applications.

This article was originally published May 31.

Pages

The US Department of Justice has proposed a rule change to enable DNA to be collected from migrants, the Associated Press reports.

Bernard Fisher, a surgeon who changed how breast cancer is treated, has died at 101, the New York Times reports.

Washington Post columnist writes that she is skeptical about DNA-based diets.

In PNAS this week: recurrent inactivation of DEPDC5 in gastrointestinal stromal tumors, taxonomic reliability of GenBank sequences, and more.