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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

At a user meeting in London this week, Chief Technology Officer Clive Brown introduced the SmidgIon and a number of other technology developments, as well as a new synthetic biology spinoff.

Two groups independently developed statistical methods that can call methylation marks from nanopore sequence data. 

Breaching the Barrier

Whole-genome sequencing advances hold promise for medicine, the Financial Times reports.

In a letter to the International Trade Commission, Oxford claimed that the suit is an attempt by Illumina to expand its monopoly in the DNA sequencing market.

The new R9 pore, which the company has licensed from VIB in Belgium and plans to release for the MinIon and the PromethIon, is based on the E. coli CsgG nanopore.

Almost Unicorn

Market research analysis firm Beauhurst says Oxford Nanopore is growing fast and highly valued.

The lawsuits relate to patents that Illumina licensed exclusively from UW and UAB on methods for using the MspA pore in nanopore sequencing.

The company is working on new tools for sample preparation and data analysis that will make the MinIon more suitable for educational users.

Pacific Biosciences' launch of the Sequel instrument, Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinIon instrument, and 10X Genomics' technology excited the market in 2015.

As part of a course this fall, 20 undergraduate and graduate students used the MinIon in two hands-on "hackathon" sequencing projects.

Pages

The New York City Police Department will be removing DNA profiles from a local database if they are from people who were never convicted of a crime, the New York Times reports.

Science reports that accusations of sexual assault against a microbiome researcher has also led to questions about his academic certifications.

Wired reports that researchers are analyzing the DNA fish leave behind in water to study their populations.

In Science this week: comprehensive cellular map of the human thymus, evidence of admixture between the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovan and a 'superarchaic' population.