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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

Two teams from Europe and the US took the Oxford MinIon sequencer to West Africa to sequence Ebola samples.

The researchers described in a pre-print publication a modified sample prep process that enabled them to increase read lengths to over 100 kb.

The firm will launch a new version of the MinIon in 2016 and plans early access for the PromethIon this year. It also previewed an automated sample preparation system called Voltrax.

A recent presentation at the Clinical Virology Symposium highlighted the potential of unbiased sequencing for diagnosing infectious disease.

For their initial project, the group performed 16S sequencing of a Tanzanian frog species, potentially identifying a new species.

To demonstrate the method, the researchers assembled a 3.6-mb bacterial genome into one contig with average accuracy of 99.99 percent.

With funding from Oxford Nanopore, the lab is building nanopores with fluid lipid bilayer coatings for the analysis of amyloid aggregates and other proteins.

The survey, conducted by GenomeWeb in conjunction with investment bank William Blair, found that users operate their NGS instruments at different capacities.

Scientists from Edgewood Chemical Biological Center and Signature Science published the study this week in GigaScience.

At AGBT last week, MinIon users reported de novo genome assembly, human cDNA sequencing, microbial surveillance, and other projects.

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CBS This Morning highlights recent Medicare fraud involving offers of genetic testing.

Researchers find that many cancer drugs in development don't work quite how their developers thought they did, as Discover's D-brief blog reports.

Mariya Gabriel, a Bulgarian politician, is to be the next European Union research commissioner, according to Science.

In Science this week: a survey indicates that US adults are more likely to support the agricultural use of gene drives if they target non-native species and if they are limited, and more.