Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

At AGBT, researchers reported on progress made in generating megabase-long reads on the MinIon, as well as initial work doing direct RNA sequencing. 

The US ITC has ruled that Oxford Nanopore's products do not infringe on single-molecule sequencing-related patents held by PacBio. 

Clive Brown, the company's chief technology officer, provided an update on the firm's business and talked about new products and planned improvements.

 

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: nanopore sequencing and assembly human genome, method to reduce CRISPR off-target effects, and more.

Such Long Sequences

Researchers have used a portable nanopore sequencer to sequence and assemble a human reference genome.

The researchers plan to develop a clinical test to monitor CML patients in remission for the BCR-ABL1 rearrangement. 

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: tool to identify bacterial plasmid sequences, long-read sequencing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, and more.

More than a third of NGS users plan to purchase a new sequencing system within a year, according to the survey, conducted by GenomeWeb and investment bank William Blair. 

Shrink It Down

Portable DNA sequencers are being used in wider range of locations, the Economist reports.

Japanese researchers developing the method highlighted its ability to accurately and rapidly diagnose different strains of malaria in resource-limited endemic regions. 

Pages

A new study in JAMA finds that genetic tests might not be able to determine what diet is right for someone seeking to lose weight.

A genome-wide association study that linked common genetic variants to salivary gland carcinoma risk has been retracted, according to Retraction Watch.

Vampire bats' ability to live off blood is etched in their genomes and gut microbiomes, the Scientist reports.

In Genome Biology this week: peopling of the Sahara, epigenetic reprogramming analysis of liverwort, and more.