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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

The firm said CRISPR will enable targeted sequencing of long regions of interest that were previously only accessible with long-read whole-genome sequencing.

The UK-based sequencing technology firm continues to seek invalidation of PacBio's patents, despite unsuccessful earlier efforts.

The company believes that Xdrop will find adopters in academia and clinical research, although diagnostics is on its radar.

The patent, EP3170904, "Compositions and methods for nucleic acid sequencing," is the second PacBio patent revoked by the EPO this year. 

In a message posted on Twitter today, Oxford Nanopore said that revenues grew to $43.7 million last year, up from $17.8 million in 2017.

At the company's annual user meeting in London, staff members previewed upgrades and changes that will result in higher throughput and accuracy at lower sequencing costs.

The project plans to sequence 20,000 genomes in 2019, 50,000 by the end of 2020, and a total of 100,000 by the end of 2021 using Oxford Nanopore's PromethIon platform.

The method, presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, may provide results in hours rather than a week or more.

The study used a variety of sequencing and mapping technologies, including from Illumina, Pacific Biosciences, 10X Genomics, Bionano Genomics, and Oxford Nanopore.

The Telomere-to-Telomere consortium has already generated a gapless assembly of the human X chromosome and aims to complete all chromosomes over the next two years or so.

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A new analysis finds that nearly half the late-stage clinical trials sponsored by a US National Cancer Institute program influence patient care.

Technology Review reports that sickle cell patients are optimistic about gene editing to treat their disease, but are worried about how available it will be.

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In Nature this week: babies born by caesarean section are more likely to have altered gut microbiota profiles, and more.