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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

Early-access users of the Flongle said the small, inexpensive flow cells allow them to develop new methods quickly and to check the quality of clones and libraries.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: population genetics of region with high Burkitt lymphoma rates, analysis of Brazilian Chikungunya virus strains, and more.

The US Court of Appeals upheld a previous ruling by the International Trade Commission that found Oxford Nanopore's products do not infringe on PacBio's patents.

Three long-read assemblies — two from PacBio data alone and one from Oxford Nanopore and Illumina data — had considerably more indel errors in genes than short-read assemblies.

Oxford Nanopore had challenged the validity of the patent, EP3045542, which relates to DNA sample preparation for PacBio's circular consensus sequencing.

Circulomics, Bionano, Sage Science, RevoluGen, and others have been developing methods for extracting DNA hundreds of kilobases and up to megabases in length.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: metagenomic nanopore sequencing of Lassa fever outbreak, and more.

New Pore and More

At a user meeting, Oxford Nanopore gave an update on what it has been working on.

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Researchers representing scientists and students of Chinese descent voice their concerns about recent US policies and rhetoric.

Wired reports that researchers have shown they could reprogram a DNA-based computer.

Researchers say increased diversity in genomic studies will benefit all, PBS NewsHour reports.

In Science this week: whole-genome sequencing of single sperm cells, and more.