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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

  • CEO: Gordon Sanghera
  • Website: www.nanoporetech.com
  • Ticker symbol: Privately held
  • Headquarters: Oxford, UK
  • Number of employees: 250+

At AGBT, UCSC's Karen Miga provided updates on the human pangenome reference project and the telomere-to-telomere consortium's genome assembly work.

In Nature this week: a new method for high-throughput amplicon sequencing, and more.

The companies say that the integration of the Nvidia DGX Station A100 will support "real-time analyses" of long-read DNA and RNA sequences.

In Nature this week: computational tool for the hybrid de novo assembly of human genomes, and more.

Quick Viral Tracing

Australian researchers say a nanopore sequencing strategy could quickly trace the source of a SARS-CoV-2 infection, according to Reuters.

The company said it will use the funding to integrate Oxford Nanopore Technologies' ultra-long read genomic sequencing into its service.

During its Nanopore Community Meeting, held online this year, the firm announced several product releases, technology improvements, and development projects.

The approach, which is developed for both Illumina and nanopore sequencing, had high sensitivity and specificity for identifying bacteria and fungi.

Investors in the round included International Holdings Company (IHC), based in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and RPMI Railpen, a UK pension fund.

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A survey by Nature finds that most researchers want scientific meetings to continue virtually or with a virtual component, even after the pandemic ends.

Bloomberg reports that the B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2 viral variant could prompt the formulation of better vaccines.

Certain blood proteins may be able to distinguish COVID-19 patients who will become critically ill from those who will not, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

In Genome Biology this week: algorithm to assess regulatory features, approach to integrate multiple single-cell RNA-seq datasets, and more.