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Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

Under the non-exclusive deal, Oxford Nanopore can include the technology, which targets long DNA fragments, in its nanopore sequencing products.

The funding will be used to start a new trial to assess the benefits of repeat population testing, expand existing trials, and increase PCR-based testing capacity.

Numbers Needed

New Scientist writes there aren't much data available on the accuracy of the two rapid COVID-19 tests the UK plans to roll out.

The UK is implementing COVID-19 testing with a 90-minute turnaround time.

Both tests can detect SARS-CoV-2 in 90 minutes and will detect viruses like influenza and respiratory syncytial virus that tend to occur in the winter.

The new pore, a complex between E. coli CsgG and part of CsgF, called certain homopolymers more accurately than an engineered version of CsgG.

The company is also working on a diagnostic COVID-19 test, called LamPore, that will run on its MinIon and GridIon nanopore sequencing platforms

Combining Ubiquitome's handheld PCR device and Oxford Nanopore's sequencer may enable a single person to screen 500 samples and obtain 24 whole genome sequences per day.

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AstraZeneca has released its coronavirus vaccine trial protocol, according to the New York Times.

Time magazine looks into how liquid biopsies are changing cancer care.

According to the Guardian, more than 150 countries have signed on to a global SARS-CoV-2 vaccine plan.

In PNAS this week: similar muscle protein patterns across hypertrophic cardiomyopathy phenotypes, analysis of gene expression and brain anatomy in major depression, and more.