Close Menu

Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

The British Columbia Centre for Disease Control will use genomic analysis to identify the origins and spread of SARS-CoV-2, formerly known as 2019-nCoV.

The methods exploit a feature of Oxford Nanopore's technology that ejects molecules mid-read, enabling a new level of control over human DNA sequencing runs.

All three methods build on the use of methyltransferases to mark accessible regions of the genome, using nanopore sequencing to detect the modifications.

Assemblies of two basmati rice genomes enabled researchers to trace the origins of the rice variety and could help pinpoint desired rice genes for breeding.

The rise of new protein analysis techniques have some questioning whether mass spec will in coming years retain its dominant position within proteomics.

The researchers also found that the virus was closely related to two bat-derived SARS-like coronaviruses collected in China in 2018.

Unlike the Hi-C chromosome conformation assay, the Pore-C technique reveals information that's lost with short-read sequencing.

Mere weeks after the 2019-nCoV sequence was released, firms, agencies, and research groups have already created PCR-based tests.

The UK-based sequencing technology firm raised £29.3 million in capital and sold £80.2 million in secondary shares.

Researchers from France's DreamPore and their collaborators used a nanopore to distinguish between 15 of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids.

Pages

The New York Times looks at companies using genomic tools to try to quickly identify the cause of patients' infections.

The White House has asked for $2.5 billion in funding to address the COVID-19 outbreak, according to the Associated Press.

A resignation at the Marine Biological Laboratory highlights that institutions are unsure of how to handle researchers previously found to have violated codes of conduct, Nature News says.

In PNAS this week: immune responses that affect heart transplant rejection risk, gene variants associated with thiopurine toxicity, and more.