Omicia

Genome Medical will use the platform for ongoing examination of patients' genomic data to augment data analysis, annotation, and interpretation.

Luxembourg-based data-management firm Information Technology for Translational Medicine will host genomic data for Fabric's customers in the European Union.

The companies aim to offer an end-to-end oncology genomic testing and clinical interpretation service for clinical laboratory customers.

The deal will join Fabric's genome annotation technology with Veritas' myGenome personal whole-genome sequencing service.

The company also announced that it is launching a new end-to-end clinical sequencing platform. 

Congenica will use the proceeds to establish its presence in the US and China, where it will court not only clinical genetics labs, but specialists, academics, biotech, and pharma.

In addition to variant detection technology, Omicia also gets technologies like data compression, which will aid diagnostics development and data storage. 

The institute recently launched rapid genome sequencing for critically ill newborns and plans to test genomic sequencing in several programs and clinical trials.

The institute will use Omicia's Opal Clinical system to achieve its goal of a 24-hour turnaround time for large-scale genome testing in its intensive care units.

Omicia will use the proceeds to accelerate product development, expand sales and marketing, and extend variations of its flagship Opal Clinical platform for NGS data analysis.

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Sequencing could help combat foodborne illnesses, according to a blog post by Food and Drug Administration officials.

Popular Mechanics reports that Caltech researchers have built a prototype nanobot using DNA.

The Sacramento Bee writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing connected a woman to sperm donor-conceived half siblings.

In PLOS this week: gene expression catalog for sheep, viral diversity among respiratory samples from camels, and more.