Omicia

After a 2017 rebranding as Fabric Genomics, the former Omicia is looking to the future of genomics in community hospitals and national sequencing programs.

As of this week, the project had sequenced 39,500 genomes and returned reports for about 3,000 rare disease families and more than 600 cancer patients.

Genome Medical will use the platform for ongoing examination of patients' genomic data to augment data analysis, annotation, and interpretation.

Luxembourg-based data-management firm Information Technology for Translational Medicine will host genomic data for Fabric's customers in the European Union.

The companies aim to offer an end-to-end oncology genomic testing and clinical interpretation service for clinical laboratory customers.

The deal will join Fabric's genome annotation technology with Veritas' myGenome personal whole-genome sequencing service.

The company also announced that it is launching a new end-to-end clinical sequencing platform. 

Congenica will use the proceeds to establish its presence in the US and China, where it will court not only clinical genetics labs, but specialists, academics, biotech, and pharma.

In addition to variant detection technology, Omicia also gets technologies like data compression, which will aid diagnostics development and data storage. 

The institute recently launched rapid genome sequencing for critically ill newborns and plans to test genomic sequencing in several programs and clinical trials.

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Researchers in the UK and Australia uncover genetic links between BMI and depression, the Guardian reports.

The Verge details the account of an academic who alleges her university retaliated against her after she complained of sexual harassment by her supervisor.

The New York Times writes that natural history museums are helping round out genetic studies with older specimens.

In PNAS this week: artemisinin resistance mutations in malaria parasites, ant-plant interactions over time, and more.