As of this week, the project had sequenced 39,500 genomes and returned reports for about 3,000 rare disease families and more than 600 cancer patients.

Genome Medical will use the platform for ongoing examination of patients' genomic data to augment data analysis, annotation, and interpretation.

Luxembourg-based data-management firm Information Technology for Translational Medicine will host genomic data for Fabric's customers in the European Union.

The companies aim to offer an end-to-end oncology genomic testing and clinical interpretation service for clinical laboratory customers.

The deal will join Fabric's genome annotation technology with Veritas' myGenome personal whole-genome sequencing service.

The company also announced that it is launching a new end-to-end clinical sequencing platform. 

Congenica will use the proceeds to establish its presence in the US and China, where it will court not only clinical genetics labs, but specialists, academics, biotech, and pharma.

In addition to variant detection technology, Omicia also gets technologies like data compression, which will aid diagnostics development and data storage. 

The institute recently launched rapid genome sequencing for critically ill newborns and plans to test genomic sequencing in several programs and clinical trials.

The institute will use Omicia's Opal Clinical system to achieve its goal of a 24-hour turnaround time for large-scale genome testing in its intensive care units.


An opinion piece in the Guardian argues that President Donald Trump is uninterested in science and that might not be a bad thing for the field.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports the Veterans Affairs Health System is studying whether genetic testing can help prescribe better depression therapies.

Stat News reports that Spark Therapeutics' Luxturna is now being used to treat a wider array of patients.

In Genome Biology this week: transcription factor use among brittle stars, single-cell RNA sequencing strategy, and more.