Nitto Denko

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Japan's Nitto Denko announced this month that it has initiated a Phase Ib study of its siRNA-based fibrosis treatment ND-L02-s0201, just months after the drug successfully completed a Phase Ia safety study in healthy volunteers.

Key RNAi Drugs in the Clinic

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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – With more interest from industry and investors than ever before, the RNAi therapeutics field has a record number of drug candidates in human testing for indications ranging from viral disease to cancer to skin disorders.

Title: Drug Carrier and Drug Carrier Kit for Inhibiting Fibrosis
Patent Number: 8,652,526
Filed: April 4, 2012

Title: Therapeutic Agent for Pulmonary Fibrosis
Patent Number: 8,574,623
Filed: Oct. 10, 2012
Lead Inventor: Yoshiro Niitsu, Nitto Denko

Title: Nucleic Acids Involved in Viral Infection
Patent Number: 8,481,506
Filed: Dec. 5, 2007
Lead Inventor: Isaac Bentwich, Rosetta Genomics

A new firm threw its hat into the RNAi therapeutics ring this week, with San Diego startup Arcturus Therapeutics announcing that it has raised $1.3 million in seed financing to advance proprietary siRNA delivery and formulation technologies into in vivo proof-of-concept

Roughly three years after partnering with Quark Pharmaceuticals to develop siRNA-based treatments for fibrotic diseases, Japan’s Nitto Denko has initiated its first clinical trial of an RNAi drug.

Title: microRNA Expression in Human Peripheral Blood Microvesicles and Uses Thereof
Patent Number: 8,455,199
Filed: Sept. 12, 2008
Lead Inventor: Clay Marsh, Ohio State University

Title: Modified Dicer Polypeptide and Methods of Use Thereof
Patent Number: 8,440,430
Filed: March 18, 2009
Lead Inventor: Jennifer Doudna, University of California, Oakland

Title: Means for Inhibiting the Expression of Protein Kinase 3
Patent Number: 8,232,256
Filed: July 20, 2007
Lead Inventor: Jorg Kaufmann, Silence Therapeutics

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A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

Researchers generate a genetic database from skeletal remains from the 1845 Franklin Expedition to the Arctic, Live Science reports.

Researchers in China have begun another trial using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches in cancer patients, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: human DNA found in sediments from archeological sites lacking bones, and more.