Nitto Denko

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Japan's Nitto Denko announced this month that it has initiated a Phase Ib study of its siRNA-based fibrosis treatment ND-L02-s0201, just months after the drug successfully completed a Phase Ia safety study in healthy volunteers.

Key RNAi Drugs in the Clinic

Premium

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – With more interest from industry and investors than ever before, the RNAi therapeutics field has a record number of drug candidates in human testing for indications ranging from viral disease to cancer to skin disorders.

Title: Drug Carrier and Drug Carrier Kit for Inhibiting Fibrosis
Patent Number: 8,652,526
Filed: April 4, 2012

Title: Therapeutic Agent for Pulmonary Fibrosis
Patent Number: 8,574,623
Filed: Oct. 10, 2012
Lead Inventor: Yoshiro Niitsu, Nitto Denko

Title: Nucleic Acids Involved in Viral Infection
Patent Number: 8,481,506
Filed: Dec. 5, 2007
Lead Inventor: Isaac Bentwich, Rosetta Genomics

A new firm threw its hat into the RNAi therapeutics ring this week, with San Diego startup Arcturus Therapeutics announcing that it has raised $1.3 million in seed financing to advance proprietary siRNA delivery and formulation technologies into in vivo proof-of-concept

Roughly three years after partnering with Quark Pharmaceuticals to develop siRNA-based treatments for fibrotic diseases, Japan’s Nitto Denko has initiated its first clinical trial of an RNAi drug.

Title: microRNA Expression in Human Peripheral Blood Microvesicles and Uses Thereof
Patent Number: 8,455,199
Filed: Sept. 12, 2008
Lead Inventor: Clay Marsh, Ohio State University

Title: Modified Dicer Polypeptide and Methods of Use Thereof
Patent Number: 8,440,430
Filed: March 18, 2009
Lead Inventor: Jennifer Doudna, University of California, Oakland

Title: Means for Inhibiting the Expression of Protein Kinase 3
Patent Number: 8,232,256
Filed: July 20, 2007
Lead Inventor: Jorg Kaufmann, Silence Therapeutics

Pages

The New York Times and ProPublica look into the close relationship between a startup and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Yahoo News reports millions of dollars are being transferred from NIH, CDC, and other programs to pay for the housing of detained undocumented immigrant children.

In Science this week: in vitro generation of human reproductive cells, and more.

Researchers gave a handful of octopuses MDMA to find that they too act more social on the drug, Gizmodo reports.