New England Biolabs

New England Biolabs is using Avacta's affimers with a development-stage research and diagnostic assay that could launch as early as next year.

The partnership will allow customers using NEBNext Direct target enrichment products to analyze data with the Bluebee platform.

The two companies will work to characterize new Cas nucleases, and NEB will then manufacture and commercially distribute the nucleases globally.

The services will couple NEB's reagents and expertise in enzyme development and manufacturing with TTP's Desktop Biology product development and engineering know-how.

Researchers outlined the "nicking enzyme-assisted sequencing" (NicE-seq) protocol and presented results from proof-of-principal open chromatin profiling experiments.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: intellectual property landscape of CRISPR genome editing, and more.

The team found that DNA damage affects a variety of samples and may lead to erroneous low-frequency variant calls unless stringent filtering is applied or the damage is repaired prior to sequencing.

The company published the results of an extensive error analysis and plans to use its new high-sensitivity fidelity assay to develop enzymes in the future.

Anna-Sophia Boguraev during her visit to New England Biolabs. Credit: James McNeill

Co-sponsored by Boeing and miniPCR, the winning high school student's project will be carried out by astronauts aboard ISS and is believed to be the first ever PCR in space.

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Publication of He Jiankui's work on gene-edited infants would raise ethical concerns for journals, Wired and others report.

The New York Times reports that evidence linking trauma in one generation to epigenetic effects that influence subsequent generations may be overstated.

ScienceInsider reports that US National Institutes of Health researchers were told in the fall they could not obtain new human fetal tissue.

In PNAS this week: skin pigmentation evolution among KhoeSan, biomarkers for dengue virus progression, and more.